Getting More Negotiation Workshop In Philadelphia, PA, October 2-3, 2017. Click Here To Register.

Getting More Internationally

The model, based on experience and research from around the world, has been used to solve complex challenges in dozens of countries. By valuing cultural differences, far more value is created.

The Getting More model is made for international negotiations. It keys on understanding and valuing differences across countries, cultures and sensibilities. As a result, far more money is made and more value is added.

In a world that gets smaller each month, it is imperative that companies and individuals learn how to deal effectively with others from different geographical, social, political and cultural areas. It is not enough for a consulting company to say it has various foreign offices. The company must actually have the skills to get better deals across boundaries.

The Getting More team brings to bear expertise and experience in dozens of countries and hundreds of cultures: from Korea to Kuwait, Germany to Jordan, Australia to Austria, Afghan tribes to Indian dialects. Being asked to help Singapore and Malaysia build a rail link between them. Helping Colombia with terrorism and Cuba with tourism despite the overhang of their past. And much more around the world, as evidenced by examples on the right side of this page. 

Ready to get more?

To discuss how we can help your organization, call us at:
1 (215) 972-5500

Or, if you prefer, email us.

  • Bolivia: 3,000 farmers stopped growing coca for cocaine and started growing bananas. Farmers sold bananas for higher prices than coca in Argentina. 

  • UAE: the largest commercial bank made an extra $223 million in 90 days after our workshop - more customers and better deals throughout the Middle East.

  • Ukraine: a military rocket maker secured the largest foreign-sourced commercial financing in the country’s history.

  • China: a multibillion dollar chemical company became more competitive against foreign rivals after discovering internal comms weren't collaborative.